South Korean Human Rights Monitor

women’s rights

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“Possibly Pregnant? No Room to Work Here” High School Refuses Hire

Ji Hyun Park April 10, 2013

The National Human Rights Commission of Korea judged that a school’s refusal to hire an applicant due to possible pregnancy was an act of discrimination. A 32-year-old woman applied for a teaching position in B high school. Since the applicant had a good record she expected to be hired without incident. However, the school refused… Continue Reading »

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Increase in Baby Box: What makes single moms give up their baby?

Eunju Jeong March 24, 2013

In the state of an increase of abandoned babies by social prejudices for single moms, a baby box system was developed and became controversial. A church located in Seoul developed the baby box to protect babies from harm in the process of abandonment, so they can be sent to the orphanages safely. However, there is… Continue Reading »

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Strict Dress Code of Female Employees

Eunjung Cha November 19, 2012

No glasses, wearing skirts only, regulating hairstyles, earring size and skirt length-these are dress codes of female flight attendants implemented by Asiana airline, which is South Korea’s domestic and international airline. Recently, this topic was posed as a controversial issue which is up for debate. That is, Asiana Airlines branch of Korean Transport Workers’ Union… Continue Reading »

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Birth Control Under Debate

Sodam Kim March 30, 2012

The Korean government is considering making emergency contraceptive pills available over the counter. Contrary to normal birth control pills, which are available over-the-counter [hereafter “OTC”], emergency contraceptive pills are not. However, the denouncement from pulpits and concern about misuse are nothing to overlook. Even normal birth control pills are under hot debate. A public hearing… Continue Reading »

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Weekly News Brief June 29~July 4, 2011

Soo Yon Suh July 4, 2011

Public Baths restrict the entrance of senior citizens without proper chaperone Ae Rim Koo (aerimkoo@humanrightskorea.org) Majority of public bath facilities are allowing persons the age of 65 and older to enter only when they are accompanied by guardians. This has been introduced as there is an increasing concern for accidents in the public baths. According… Continue Reading »

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